HOME EXHIBITIONSLUONTOKUVA

Luontokuva

Maija Albrecht
Maria Hedlund
Outi Heiskanen
Mari Keski-Korsu
Iwo Myrin
Mindaugas Navakas
Gediminas Pempė
Merja Salo

This was the first group exhibition at Kohta. Luontokuva is a Finnish word that literally means ‘nature image’ but really denotes a special genre of nature photography: usually rather romanticised shots – think young elks in early morning sunshine, their horns playfully interlocked – snapped by technically skilled non-professionals: a minister of foreign affairs or the CEO of a major paper and pulp company enjoying some quality time outdoors…

The title was therefore to some extent ironic, but above all purposely naïve. It insisted that words may retain a ‘first’ meaning beneath and beyond their socio-cultural connotations, but above all that nature remains a significant topic for visual art, not least today when ‘climate anxiety’ is rampant in northern Europe, and for good reasons.

The exhibition itself intended to question not only the concept of ‘nature’ but also that of ‘image’. An image can, at the same time, be an object (a sculpture, a found object, a page from a printed book), a process (a moving image, an installation with moving parts) and an action (comprising people and objects that ‘represent themselves’ whether they are being depicted or not). Luontokuva contained images of all these kinds, and also images that can be approached in more than one way.

Moreover, Luontokuva is an attempt to resurrect and rehabilitate a method for making exhibitions that was standard at the Nordic Arts Centre at Suomenlinna, the island fortress just off Helsinki, some twenty-five or thirty years ago. For larger group shows, at least two artists from each of the Nordic countries would be invited. Such visualisations of political equity, deemed hopelessly unfashionable in the late 1990s, now appear ready for re-evaluation. The Nordic regional perspective is again becoming relevant, even more so than before economic globalisation gained full speed.

The group behind Kohta suggests that this method is worth trying again. This exhibition therefore features two artists each from Lithuania and Sweden and four from Finland, the host country:

Maija Albrecht (Finland, 1967) revives a small-gesture ‘magical realism’ reminiscent of the best printmaking from the 1970s and ultimately of pre-war surrealism. Her dry point engravings gather elements from closely observed animal and plant life – mostly birds’ eyes and beaks, but also roots and seeds – into eerie visual constellations that could not possibly be images of nature.

Maria Hedlund, Utan titel (under arbete) (Untitled (Work in Progress)), 2018, taxidermied ozelot kitten on sawn-off wardrobe in wooden crate. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

Maria Hedlund (Sweden, 1961) peels away layers of conventional seeing and understanding. She makes the world fit into her flat, which becomes a refuge for rejected plants, abandoned collections, too easily discarded knowledge. The medium is analogue photography – and the objects that can be photographed. The topic is the nature of things, here a stuffed ozelot kitten from a fur shop.

Outi Heiskanen, Juuri 4 (Root 4), 2015, etching, photo engraving (with Janne Laine). Photo: Jussi Tiainen

Outi Heiskanen (Finland, 1937) is a classic of Finnish post-war visual art, precisely because her prints and drawings are so uncompromisingly idiosyncratic that they cannot be styled as characteristic of the country or the period. In collaboration with Metti Nordin, Heiskanen’s daughter, we have made a selection of drawings and ink washings of hybrid, half-natural creatures that may even be monsters.

Mari Keski-Korsu (Finland, 1976) stages collaborations between individuals, communities and species. The reflective and the recursive are crucial aspects of her practice. Clear-Cut Preservation (2010–80) fences off forestry on a hectare of clear-cut forest in Tunnila, Finland, for 70 years, with a photograph taken every hour. Lähirohtola (Local Plant Pharmacy, 2018) involves ‘plant ambassadors’ in the Kaarela area of Helsinki to promote representation of plants in the human domain as well as the knowledge and use of wild-growing medical plants usually considered weeds.

Iwo Myrin, Kremlor vid kanten av en stubbe (Russula Mushrooms by the Edge of a Stump) 59° 25’15” N, 018° 13’59” E, 27.09.2010, bronze. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

Iwo Myrin (Sweden, 1964) first took pinhole photographs of the underbrush in northern forests, often centred on growing mushrooms. His next step was to cast the same underbrush in bronze, again with mushrooms in prominent positions. The technique is an adaptation of ‘lost wax’, with nature itself in the role of the original that must be sacrificed (melted, burned out) for its copy to become unique.

Mindaugas Navakas, Šnaresiai (Rustlings), 2003, marble, metal, bamboo, leaves in silicon, sound system. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

Mindaugas Navakas (Lithuania, 1952) typically makes ultra-large-scale, ultra-heavy-weight work in materials such as granite or welded steel, while still managing to keep it subtle, thoughtful and somehow flippant. The Kiasma collection has some pieces by him. Šnaresiai (Rustling, 2003) is a smaller sound installation combining monumental and ephemeral parts.

Gediminas Pempė, illustration for the book Lauko augalų kenkėjai ir ligos (Pests and Diseases of Field Plants), 1990–94. Courtesy the M K Čiurlionis National Art Museum, Kaunas. Photo: Anders Kreuger

Gediminas Pempė (Lithuania, 1922–2008) was a productive and versatile graphic designer who authored many logotypes for Soviet Lithuanian enterprises and organisations, but also a trained agricultural scientist and an extraordinarily sensitive and precise illustrator of encyclopaedic books on nature. A selection of his watercolours for the book Lauko augalų kenkėjai ir ligos (Pests and Diseases of Field Plants, 1994) was kindly lent by the M K Čiurlionis National Art Museum in Kaunas.

Merja Salo, from Musta kasvisto – illuusioita luonnosta (Black Herbarium: Illusions about Nature), 1983

Merja Salo (Finland, 1953–2018) passed away before we were able to do the studio visit to prepare her participation in Luontokuva. As a homage to one of Finland’s leading photographic artists and art pedagogues, we exhibited original prints of the photographs in her perhaps best known book Musta kasvisto – Illuusioita luonnosta (Black Herbarium: Illusions about Nature, published in 1984) in collaboration with the estate.

Luontokuva was organised by Kohta, with support from IASPIS/Konstnärsnämnden in Stockholm and the Lithuanian Cultural Institute in Vilnius.

Maria Hedlund, Utan titel (under arbete) (Untitled (Work in Progress)), 2018, black-and-white photography, stuffed ozelot kitten on wardrobe in wooden crate. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

On the wall, left to right: Maija Albrecht, Elämän arvaamattomuudesta (On the Unpredictability of Life), 2017; Ihmisen sokeus (Human Blindness), 2018; Näkömuisti (Visual Memory), 2016; Harha (Illusion), 2016; Ihminen (Human), 2107; Kolmas silmä (The Third Eye), 2014; Dandy, 2016; Mörkö laulaa kauniisti (The Groke Sings Beautifully), 2014; Vaihtoehtosia tapoja nähdä (Alternative Ways of Seeing), 2016 (all dry point on paper). In the vitrine: Gediminas Pempė, illustrations for the book Laukų augalų kenkėjai ir ligos (Pests and Diseases of Field Plants), 1990–94, watercolour on paper, each 16.2 x 12 cm. Courtesy the M K Čiurlionis National Art Museum, Kaunas. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

On the monitors: Mari Keski-Korsu, Clear-Cut Preservation: As Slow as the Tree Grows, 2018, two-channel video, 30′. On the plinths: Iwo Myrin, Häggtrattskivling (Trooping Funnel) 59° 12’38” N, 018° 21’12” E, 19.09.2014; Kremlor vid kanten av en stubbe (Russula Mushrooms by the Edge of a Stump) 59° 25’15” N, 018° 13’59” E, 27.09.2010; Gammal skivling med sprucken hatt (Old Agaric with Broken Cap) 59° 33’06” N, 018° 21’45″E, 04.12.2006; Klubbspindelskivling (Contrary Webcap) 59° 33’01” N, 018° 21’41” E, 20.09.2017; Pluggskivling (Poison Pax) 59° 10’07” N, 018° 07’48” E, 18.10.2017 (all bronze casts of mushrooms). On the wall, left to right: Outi Heiskanen, Verijuuri (Blood Root), 1992, etching; Juuri 1–4 (Root 1–4), 2015, etching, photo engraving (with Janne Laine). Photo: Jussi Tiainen

On the wall: Merja Salo, Musta kasvisto – illuusioita luonnosta (Black Herbarium: Illusions about Nature), 1983, black-and-white photographs. Courtesy of the artist’s estate. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

Left to right: photographs by Maria Hedlund, prints by Maija Albrecht, bronze sculptures by Iwo Myrin, prints and ink drawings by Outi Heiskanen and sculptural installation by Mindaugas Navakas. Photo: Jussi Tiainen

Maija Albrecht
Maria Hedlund
Outi Heiskanen
Mari Keski-Korsu
Iwo Myrin
Mindaugas Navakas
Gediminas Pempė
Merja Salo

Tämä oli ensimmäinen ryhmänäyttely taidehallissamme. Luontokuva merkitsee tiettyä luontovalokuvauksen muotoa: useimmiten jokseenkin romantisoituja otoksia – ehkä nuorista hirvistä aamun sarastuksessa, sarvet leikkisästi ristissä – teknisesti taitavien ulkoilmaintoilijoiden tallentamina – ehkä ulkoministeri tai paperiyhtiön toimitusjohtaja viettämässä laatuaikaa luonnossa…

Näyttelyn nimi oli siis jollain tapaa ironinen, mutta ennen kaikkea tietoisen naiivi. Se vaatii, että sanojen ”alkuperäinen” tarkoitus voi säilyä niiden sosiaaliskulttuurisista konnotaatioista huolimatta, mutta ennen kaikkea, että luonto säilyy tärkeänä ja ajankohtaisena kuvataiteen aiheena, erityisesti nyt kun ilmastoahdistus jyllää Pohjois-Euroopassa, ja hyvistä syistä.

Näyttely itse pyrkii kyseenalaistamaan sekä luonnonettä kuvankäsitteet. Kuva voi olla samaan aikaan esine (veistos, löydetty esine, painetun kirjan sivu), prosessi (liikkuva kuva, liikkuvista osista koostuva installaatio) ja teko (koostuen ihmisistä ja asioista, joita ei ole kuvattu, vaan jotka ”esittävät itseään”). Luontokuvassaon mukana kaikkia näitä kuvia, mutta myös sellaisia, joita voi kuvailla useammalla kuin yhdellä näistä tavoista.

Luontokuvaon lisäksi pyrkimys elvyttää ja palauttaa näyttelyiden tekemisen metodi, joka oli tunnusomainen 25–30 vuotta sitten Pohjoismaisessa taidekeskuksessa Suomenlinnassa. Suurempiin ryhmänäyttelyihin kutsuttiin aina vähintään kaksi taiteilijaa jokaisesta Pohjoismaasta – havainnollistava esimerkki poliittisesta tasa-arvosta, joka 1990-luvun lopulla tuomittiin toivottoman vanhentuneeksi, mutta joka nyt tuntuu olevan taas valmis uudelleenarvioitavaksi. Alueellinen perspektiivi pohjoismaisuuteen on taas muuttumassa ajankohtaiseksi, jopa enemmän kuin aikana ennen talouden globalisaatiota.

Kohtan taustalla toimiva ryhmä ehdottaa tätä metodia jälleen kokeilemisen arvoisena. Tässä näyttelyssä on siten mukana kaksi taiteilijaa Liettuasta, kaksi Ruotsista ja neljä Suomesta, isäntämaasta:

Maija Albrecht (Suomi, 1967) herättää henkiin vähäeleisen ”maagisen realismin”, joka muistuttaa 1970-luvun painotöiden parhaimmistoa ja jonka juuret ovat sotia edeltävässä surrealismissa. Hänen kuivaneulakaiverruksensa kokoavat yksityiskohtia eläin- ja kasvimaailman lähiluvusta – enimmäkseen lintujen silmiä ja nokkia, mutta myös juuria ja siemeniä – aavemaisiksi visuaalisiksi esityksiksi, jotka tuntuvat olevan vain hädin tuskin kuvia luonnosta.

Maria Hedlund (Ruotsi, 1961) kuorii pois näkemisen ja ymmärtämisen tavanomaisia kerroksia. Hän mahduttaa koko maailman pieneen asuntoonsa, josta tulee turvapaikka torjutuille kasveille, hylätyille hyönteiskokoelmille: liian herkästi pois heitetylle tiedolle. Välineenä on analoginen valokuva, mutta myös kuvaamisen objektit. Aiheena on asioiden luonto: tässä tapauksessa täytetty oselottipentu turkisliikkeestä.

Outi Heiskanen (Suomi, 1937) on klassikko sodanjälkeisen Suomen kuvataiteessa, tarkalleen ottaen koska hänen painotyönsä ja piirustuksensa ovat niin tinkimättömän omanlaisia, ettei niitä voi nimetä maalleen tai ajalleen tyypillisiksi. Heiskasen teoksissa, sekä yhteistyössä valokuvaaja Janne Laineen (Suomi, 1970) kanssa tehdyissä grafiikantöissä, todelliset ja kuvitellut olennot elävät sovussa luontokuvien kanssa. Esitämme Heiskasen teokset yhteistyössä hänen tyttärensä, Metti Nordinin, kanssa.

Mari Keski-Korsu (Suomi, 1976) lavastaa yhteistoimintaa yksilöiden, yhteisöjen ja lajien välille. Clear-Cut Preservation: As Slow as the Tree Grows (2010–80) eristää hehtaarin kokoisen avohakkuun 70 vuodeksi. Alueesta otetaan valokuva tunnin välein. Lähirohtola (2018) osallistaa paikallisia ”kasvilähettiläitä” Helsingin Kaarelassa levittämään tietoa yleisesti rikkakasveina pidetyistä lääkekasveista ja niiden käytöstä.

Iwo Myrin (Ruotsi, 1964) kuvasi ensin pohjoisten metsien aluskasvillisuutta itsetehdyllä neulanreikäkameralla, jonka keskiössä olivat usein kasvavat sienet. Seuraavassa vaiheessa sama aluskasvillisuus valettiin pronssiin, jossa sienet nousivat jälleen esiin. Tekniikkana on ”hukatun vahan” soveltaminen, jossa luonto – valoksen alkuperäiskappaleena – joudutaan uhraamaan (sulattamaan ja polttamaan), yksilöllisen jäljennöksen luomiseksi.

Mindaugas Navakas (Liettua, 1952) valmistaa yleensä erityisen kookkaita ja erityisen painavia teoksia raskaista materiaaleista, kuten graniitista tai teräksestä, mutta onnistuu säilyttämään herkän, harkitun ja leikittelevän ilmaisun. Kiasman kokoelmaan kuuluu joitakin hänen teoksistaan. Šnaresiai (Kahina, 2003) on vaatimattomamman formaatin ääni-installaatio, jossa yhdistyvät monumentaalisuus ja arkipäiväisyys.

Gediminas Pempė (Liettua, 1922–2008) oli tuottelias ja monipuolinen graafinen suunnittelija, joka loi useita logotyyppejä Neuvostoliiton aikaisen Liettuan yrityksille ja järjestöille, mutta kouluttautui myös maataloustieteilijäksi ja erityisen tarkaksi luonto-oppaiden kuvittajaksi. Kaunaksen M K Čiurlionisin kansallinen taidemuseo on lainannut näyttelyyn joukon vesivärimaalauksia, jotka Pempėmaalasi Lauko augalųkenkėjai ir ligos-kirjaa varten (Niittykasvien tuholaiset ja taudit, 1994).

Merja Salo (Suomi, 1953–2018) menehtyi viime kesänä ennen kuin ehdimme vierailla hänen työhuoneellaan valmistellaksemme hänen osallistumistaan Luontokuvaan. Kunnianosoituksena yhdelle Suomen johtavista valokuvataiteilijoista ja taidekasvattajista esitämme Salon kenties tunnetuimman kirjan Musta kasvisto – Illuusioita luonnosta (1984) yhteistyössä Merja Salon perikunnan ja Suomen valokuvataiteen museon kanssa.

Luontokuva on Kohtan järjestämä näyttely, jota on tukenut IASPIS/Konstnärsämnden Tukholmassa ja Liettuan kulttuuri-instituutti Vilnassa.

Maija Albrecht
Maria Hedlund
Outi Heiskanen
Mari Keski-Korsu
Iwo Myrin
Mindaugas Navakas
Gediminas Pempė
Merja Salo

Detta var den första grupputställningen i vår konsthall. Luontokuva är ett finskt ord som ordagrant betyder ”naturbild” men i själva verket betecknar en särskild form av naturfotografi: vanligen ganska romantiserade bilder – kanske av stångade älgar i tidigt morgonljus – tagna av tekniskt skickliga friluftsentusiaster – kanske en utrikesminister, kanske en direktör för ett av de stora pappersbruken.

Titeln är alltså i någon mån ironisk, men framför allt medvetet naiv. Den insisterar på att ord kan ha kvar en ”ursprunglig” mening bakom och bortom sina sociala och kulturella konnotationer, men framför allt insisterar den på att naturen är och förblir ett viktigt och aktuellt tema i bildkonsten, inte minst nu när ”klimatångesten” på goda grunder sprider sig som en löpeld i norra Europa.

Själva utställningen avsåg att ifrågasätta inte bara begreppet ”natur” utan också begreppet ”bild”. En bild kan samtidigt vara ett föremål (en skulptur, ett upphittat objekt), en process (en rörlig bild, en installation med rörliga delar) och rentav en handling (omfattande människor och föremål som inte har avbildats utan får ”stå för sig själva”). Luontokuva innefattade bilder av alla dessa slag och också bilder som kan beskrivas på fler än ett av dessa sätt.

Luontokuva var dessutom ett försök att återuppliva och återupprätta det sätt att göra utställningar som för 25–30 år sedan kännetecknade Nordiskt Konstcentrum på Sveaborg. För större grupputställningar inbjöds alltid minst två konstnärer från varje nordiskt land – ett åskådliggörande av politisk rättvisa som i slutet av nittiotalet ansågs hopplöst omodernt men nu tycks vara på väg att omvärderas. Det nordiska regionala synsättet blir återigen relevant, faktiskt i ännu högre grad än innan den ekonomiska globaliseringen fått full fart.

Vi som står bakom Kohta anser att denna metod är värd att prövas igen. I denna utställning deltar därför två konstnärer från vardera Sverige och Litauen och fyra från värdlandet Finland:

Maija Albrecht (Finland, 1967) återupplivar en lågmäld ”magisk realism” som påminner om den bästa grafiken från sjuttiotalet och har sina rötter i mellankrigstidens surrealism. Hennes torrnålsgravyrer sammanför detaljer från närläsningar av djur- och växtrikena – oftast fågelögon och näbbar, men också rötter och frön – i kusliga framställningar som knappast kan vara bilder av naturen.

Maria Hedlund (Sverige, 1961) skalar bort lager efter lager av vanemässigt seende och tänkande. Hon får hela världen att rymmas i en liten lägenhet som blir tillflyktsort för övergivna krukväxter och insektssamlingar: alltför lättvindigt bortkastad kunskap. Uttrycksmedlet är analogt fotografi men också de föremål som låter sig fotograferas. Temat är sakernas natur: här en uppstoppad ozelotunge från en pälsaffär.

Outi Heiskanen (Finland, 1937) är en klassiker i den finska efterkrigstidskonsten, just därför att hennes grafik och teckningar är så kompromisslöst personliga att de inte kan betraktas som typiska för vare sig för landet eller perioden. I hennes verk, och inte minst i de bilder hon skapade tillsammans med fotografen Janne Laine (Finland, 1970), samsas iakttagna och uppdiktade väsen med naturbilder. Vi ställde ut Heiskanens verk i samarbete med hennes dotter Metti Nordin.

Mari Keski-Korsu (Finland, 1976) iscensätter samarbeten mellan individer, gemenskaper och arter. Clear-Cut Preservation: As Slow as the Tree Grows (2010–80) fridlyser ett kalhygge på en hektar i 70 år. Varje timme tas ett fotografi av området. Lähirohtola (Närväxtapotek, 2018) engagerar ”växtambassadörer” i bostadsområdet Kaarela i Helsingfors för att främja kunskap om och användande och representation av vilt växande medicinalväxter vanligen betraktade som ogräs.

Iwo Myrin 
(Sverige, 1964, skulptur) fotograferade först undervegetationen i norrländska skogar med hemmagjorda kameror, och då hamnade växande svampar ofta mitt i bilden. Nästa steg blev att gjuta samma markutsnitt i brons, återigen med svampar i framskjutna positioner. Tekniken är en tillämpning av ”förlorat vax”, med naturen själv i rollen som det original man måste offra (smälta eller bränna ut) för att kopian ska bli unik.

Mindaugas Navakas (Litauen, 1952) skapar vanligtvis alldeles extra stora och extra tunga verk i material som granit och stål, men han lyckas ändå göra dem subtila, tänkvärda och samtidigt en smula lättsinniga. Kiasma har några verk av honom i sin samling. Šnaresiai (Susningar, 2003) är en ljudinstallation i mer anspråkslöst format med både monumentala och vardagliga beståndsdelar.

Gediminas Pempė (Litauen, 1922–2008) var en produktiv och mångsidig grafisk formgivare som låg bakom många logotyper för sovjetlitauiska företag och organisationer, men också en utbildad agronom och en utomordentligt känslig och samvetsgrann illustratör av encyklopediska böcker om naturen. Vi har fått låna ett urval av hans akvareller för boken Lauko augalų kenkėjai ir ligos (Skadedjur och sjukdomar hos utomhusväxter, 1994) från Statliga Čiurlionismuseet i Kaunas.

Merja Salo (Finland, 1953–2018) gick bort innan vi hann genomföra det ateljébesök vi hade planerat som förberedelse för hennes medverkan i Luontokuva. Som en hyllning till en av Finlands främsta konstnärer och lärare inom det fotografiska området visar vi förstoringar av fotografierna från hennes kanske mest kända bok Musta kasvisto – Illuusioita luonnosta (Svart herbarium – Illusioner om naturen, utgiven 1984) i samarbete med dödsboet.

Luontokuva organiserades av Kohta med stöd från IASPIS/Konstnärsnämnden i Stockholm och Litauiska kulturinstitutet i Vilnius.